Category Archives: News

TRAFIX: New imaging technique shortlisted for Converge Challenge

Congratulations to group member Adrià Escobet-Montalbán, whose TRAFIX project on imaging deeper within turbid media has been shortlisted for Scotland’s largest entrepeneurship award, the Converge Challenge.

Adrià’s work enables images to be acquired from deep within turbid specimens such as brain tissue and could have a major impact on neuroscience studies of alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and cancer. The new technique could be suitable for clinical use as well as basic research.

Read our pre-print on TRAFIX here.

Read more about the Converge Challenge here.

 

Posted 17/05/2018.

Research on automated cancer screening featured in Advanced Science News

Our recent publication, “Towards automated cancer screening: Label-free classification of fixed cell samples using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy” from Journal of Biophotonics, has been featured in Advanced Science News.

The article states “The introduction of national screening programs to detect (pre-)cancerous processes, such as the Papanicoloau (‘Pap’) test and mammogram, have achieved considerable success and are estimated to prevent, for example, 4,500 and 1,300 deaths in the UK every year from cervical and breast cancer, respectively.”

These programs require a great deal of investment and have limited quantitative accuracy. The article identifies our method as one “with the potential to deliver a broader scope and automated classification”.

Read the full article here.

Read the original research article here.

 

Posted: 25/04/2018

Prof. Dholakia awarded SPIE Dennis Gabor Award 2018

Kishan Dholakia, University of St Andrews, School of Physics & Astronomy, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife, is the 2018 winner of the Dennis Gabor Award in recognition of his work in optical beam shaping using dynamic and static diffractive optics. This work has led to paradigm shifts in manipulation, nano-surgery and imaging and has enabled new routes for the understanding of holographic light fields for a range of applications.

Read more about the award on the SPIE page.

 

Posted: 23/01/2018

We are hiring: Vacancies for 4 postdocs in imaging and manipulation

We are hiring! As part of our #shapedphotonics Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Programme Grant (Resonant and shaped photonics for understanding the physical and biomedical worlds), we have four research fellow vacancies in photonics, to be held in School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, University of St Andrews. Closing date for all posts is 24th November. See www.vacancies.st-andrews.ac.uk for more details, using the reference numbers:

AR1378SB Light-sheet imaging
AR2001SB Optical manipulation for applications in optomechanics and biology
AR2002SB+AR2003SB Raman spectroscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography or Light-sheet imaging for biological applications.

Applications for these positions have now closed.

 

Posted: 30/10/2017.

PI: Seeing Life through a New Light, Manchester Museum of Science and Industry, 15th July 2017

Over 900 visitors at the Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester on Saturday 15th July enjoyed activities including the “Orange juice challenge”, making pin-hole cameras, performing pepper-oscopies, and learning about light, microscopes, displays, and optical trapping at our Seeing Life through a New Light event.

Continue reading PI: Seeing Life through a New Light, Manchester Museum of Science and Industry, 15th July 2017

Prof. Dholakia awarded IOP Thomas Young Medal and Prize 2017

Professor Kishan Dholakia of this School has been awarded the Institute of Physics Thomas Young Medal and Prize for 2017. This prestigious award is for his “contributions to the field of optical micromanipulation using shaped light fields in liquid, air and vacuum”.

The citation goes on to talk about Prof Dholakia’s “internationally acknowledged and distinguished reputation for his work … including new insights into the understanding of complex light fields and their propagation”.

School of Physics & Astronomy Press Release

Posted: 30/06/2017

New class of laser wavemeter breaks the glass ceiling

The precise wavelength of a laser is important in numerous applications, but measuring changes of wavelength to one part in ten thousand million has been quite demanding. Our group has invented a new technique for doing such measurements based on the random scattering of laser light from a rough surface. This breakthrough could revolutionise the use of lasers in certain applications in quantum technologies and in healthcare.

Check out the article here: 10.1038/ncomms15610
University of St Andrews press release
School of Physics & Astronomy press release

 

Posted: 06/06/2017